Reptiles & Amphibians

Alligator Snapping Turtle

Alligator Snapping Turtle

With eyes on the side of its head and a powerful, hooked upper jaw, this primitive looking snapper is known as the dinosaur of the turtle world. The alligator snapping turtle is also the largest freshwater turtle.

American Alligator

American Alligator

With huge tails, powerful jaws, and a toothy grin few would trust, alligators are crocodilians, a group that includes crocodiles, caimans, and gharials. American alligators (and their cousin the Chinese alligator) have broader and rounder snouts than crocodiles.

Anaconda

Anaconda

The anaconda is the heaviest snake in the world as well as one of the longest. Also known as the “water boa,” it is an excellent swimmer. These constrictors can grow to more than 300 pounds and 30 feet in length.

Emerald Tree Boa Wildlife Conservation Society

Emerald Tree Boa

This brilliant green, tree-dwelling snake can often be found coiled over a branch in its rainforest home. The white pattern on its scales mimics the spots of sunlight that filter through the tree canopy.

123
Alligator Snapping Turtle

Alligator Snapping Turtle

With eyes on the side of its head and a powerful, hooked upper jaw, this primitive looking snapper is known as the dinosaur of the turtle world. The alligator snapping turtle is also the largest freshwater turtle.

American Alligator

American Alligator

With huge tails, powerful jaws, and a toothy grin few would trust, alligators are crocodilians, a group that includes crocodiles, caimans, and gharials. American alligators (and their cousin the Chinese alligator) have broader and rounder snouts than crocodiles.

Anaconda

Anaconda

The anaconda is the heaviest snake in the world as well as one of the longest. Also known as the “water boa,” it is an excellent swimmer. These constrictors can grow to more than 300 pounds and 30 feet in length.

Frog

Dart Poison Frogs

The brilliant colors and patterns of the tiny dart poison frogs aren't merely ornamental: they also warn would-be predators. If ingested, the frog's toxic skin chemicals can cause numbness, paralysis, and occasional death. Due to their symbolic exteriors, these amphibians are considered aposematic. The root of that big word? “Apo” means “away;” “sematic” means “sign.”